As You Like It Notes

' Line 3: Under threat of losing the blessing of Sir Rowland. '
' Line 9: Physically fit.'
' Line 10: Manage = skills of the horse. Riders = the horses. Dearly = expensively.'
' Line 15: Farm laborers. '
' Line 22: Bother me. '
' Line 29: A slight insult.'
' Line 31: Wanton spending, a reference to the biblical parable of a son who spent his fathers money.'
' Line 68: Swell in pride or position and shove others out of your way. '
' Line 69: Treat your rottenness.'
' Line 96: Pass the time.'
' Line 101: Reputation.'
' Line 104: Defeat.'
' Line 125: Dissect and reveal. '
' Line 136: Not liked.'
' Line 20: entertainments'
' Line 27: wheel of fortune?'
' Line 29: Fortune is often portrayed as blind.'
' Line 34: The gifts of fortune (riches, nobility, etc.) are commonly contrasted with the gifts of nature (beauty, intelligence, etc.) in Elizabethan literature. '
' Line 41: a moron.'
' Line 45: Celia suggests that she and Rosalind may be able to sharpen their wits by verbally jousting with Touchstone.'
' Line 52: The mustard was bad.'
' Line 60: If you swear by something that does not exist, and are wrong or do not do as you say, you never lied, since that which you swore by never existed in the first place. '
' Line 68: Slander.'
' Line 69: The purpose of fools was to be able to criticize those in power, those who purported to wisdom, without fear of being taken seriously enough to be punished.'
' Line 75: Pigeons feed their young by vomiting in their mouths.'
' Line 77: Birds fattened by forcing them to eat are worth more than skinny birds.'
' Line 80: Type or sort.'
' Line 83: Touchstone implies that Le Beau has neither wit nor fortune.'
' Line 84: With too much force.'
' Line 85: Position as a jester. Touchstone is saying he must keep jesting or lose his status. Celia later puns on rank as meaning smell.'
' Line 96: An old man with three sons is a common beginning of fairy tales.'
' Line 98: Bills on their necks?'
' Line 99: These presents?'
' Line 112: The sound of breaking ribs.'
' Line 135: Orlando quibbles on challenge—he is not challenging Charles, since Charles issued a challenge to anyone in the community. Orlando is just responding to that challenge.'
' Line 150: Orlando says he is ungracious to refuse these pleas to withdraw, and states that if he dies, they can take comfort in his deserving it.'
' Line 156: Add to hers.'
' Line 160: Orlando is playing with the sexual innuendo of the previous statement, saying he would never lie with his mother, but has a more proper intention.'
' Line 163: Charles is saying that while Orlando cannot now be persuaded from wrestling, it will be impossible to persuade him to do it twice after Charles is done with him.'
' Line 207: A wooden figure used as a target for lances.'
' Line 210: Rosalind suggests that Orlando has conquered her heart.'
' Line 245: Basically out of the frying pan, into the fire. '
' Line 10: In contrast to working-day. '
' Line 14: Cough up something stuck in the chest.'
' Line 18: regardless of the risk of a fall.'
' Line 24: argument'
' Line 34: Means relative in Elizabethan English.'
' Line 47: lying'
' Line 69: This is an error—Venus was associated with swans, not Juno.'
' Line 108: smear with a brown pigment.'
' Line 114: a short sword.'
' Line 115: a spear for boar hunting.'
' Line 117: a swaggering and warlike appearance.'
' Line 119: to bluff through a situation successfully.'
' Line 122: The cupbearer to the gods. '
' Line 3: artificial importance.'
' Line 5: In Eden it was always spring, until Adam and Eve were cast from the garden.'
' Line 14: This was apparently a common belief at the time. '
' Line 23: inhabitants.'
' Line 33: babbling.'
' Line 38: the leather coat, or hide of the deer. '
' Line 42: attended to.'
' Line 50: even more'
' Line 59: pauper. '
' Line 8: scurvy or paltry?'
' Line 20: hesitate timidly. '
' Line 8: the muscular prize fighter.'
' Line 33: rude and violent.'
' Line 38: ignored familial bond.'
' Line 40: Money saved from my labors.'
' Line 41: ?'
' Line 50: ?'
' Line 59: reward.'
' Line 64: The metaphor is of working on a tree that can bear no good fruit to reward the worker—Oliver is too ungrateful to pay Adam what he deserves.'
' Line 77: Not owing Oliver money? '
' Line 5: Doublet and hose is the equivalent of jacket and pants. Rosalind is basically saying that she, dressed as a man, should be brave in front of those dressed as women.'
' Line 9: Cross means both a burden and money.'
' Line 32: Tiring his listeners with his endless prattling about the one he loves.'
' Line 41: Jane Smile is a generic name for a woman. A batler is a club used for washing clothes.'
' Line 43: A pea pod was supposed to be good luck if worn by a country maid being wooed. '
' Line 46: Mortal means both subject to death and humanly prone to error. The meaning of this sentence is that everything in life is foolish when in love.'
' Line 66: A place to stay or sleep.'
' Line 76: Wants.'
' Line 78: Cottage, flocks of sheep, and pastures.'
' Line 3: Turn means to tune.'
' Line 15: A stanza, a measure of music. '
' Line 17: Debtors would write their names in the lenders books.'
' Line 21: Baboons.'
' Line 25: Set the table.'
' Line 47: The meaning of this is not well explained. ?'
' Line 53: ? '
' Line 6: Your imagination is closer to death than your actual body. '
' Line 5: made of discords.'
' Line 6: The Elizabethans believed beautiful music, which humans could not hear, was created by the planets as they moved.'
' Line 13: Motley was the many colored costume of jesters. '
' Line 17: legalistic terms of court.'
' Line 19: There was a saying that "Fortune favors fools."'
' Line 20: Pulled a watch from his pocket.'
' Line 21: Glassy and glazed.'
' Line 23: How the world goes.'
' Line 30: a rooster. '
' Line 32: without.'
' Line 39: The last stale biscuit after a voyage.'
' Line 46: Provided that you remove any thoughts that I am actually wise.'
' Line 56: unaware of the taunt.'
' Line 57: Laid bare.'
' Line 64: A coin used in a wager.'
' Line 67: lust.'
' Line 68: References to sexually transmitted diseases.'
' Line 69: A freely promiscuous lifestyle'
' Line 72: Criticize. Jaques is basically saying that he is criticizing common sins, and anyone who takes offense just points out that they have those sins.'
' Line 80: Lowliest office or social position.'
' Line 103: Being gentle will get more from us than being rough.'
' Line 122: Rung.'
' Line 147: Crying and spitting up.'
' Line 151: Furnaces had bellows to keep them oxygenated.'
' Line 153: Leopard.'
' Line 155: A bubble because it is so insubstantial, over inflated, and easily burst.'
' Line 157: ?'
' Line 159: sayings and examples.'
' Line 163: ?'
' Line 164: ?'
' Line 169: Without.'
' Line 190: Favors given to the ungrateful.'
' Line 200: His likeness of features. '
' Line 3: A substitute.'
' Line 17: Legally seize his land and house. '
' Line 2: Apparently the goddess known as Diana was also known as Cynthia or Hecate? '
' Line 10: ineffable, impossible to express. '
' Line 15: lonely '
' Line 17: without excess '
' Line 33: like an egg that is done on one side but not the other. '
' Line 38: perilous '
' Line 44: An example '
' Line 45: the skin of the sheep. '
' Line 53: tar was put on the cuts and abrasions of sheep. '
' Line 56: worms meat compared to a good piece of flesh. '
' Line 57: contemplate. Civet? '
' Line 62: Incisions to let the blood out, a common treatment of disease of the time. Raw means unlearned, but also serves to mean like a sore, implying disease.'
' Line 69: ? '
' Line 70: Crooked-pated means to have an oddly shaped head. Cuckolds were supposed to have horns on their heads. '
' Line 75: India '
' Line 79: Drawn. '
' Line 85: Just like dairy women following each other to market. '
' Line 94: Wheat must be sheaved, that is having their husks removed, and then bound together in bushels and put on a cart?'
' Line 104: To graff is to splice one tree into another, so that they will grow together. Rosalind is making a complex pun here: you as yew, the tree, and medlar as meddler, someone who interferes without invitation. Finally, the medlar was a fruit that could not be eaten until it was almost ready to decay. Basically, Rosalind both says that Touchstone is meddling where he is not wanted, and criticizes him for being rotten.'
' Line 115: How the life of man is so short that it can be fit into one hand. '
' Line 125: The vital essence of every spirit. '
' Line 126: Heaven wanted to show the best of every spirit in just one enriched little space, and so created Rosalind. '
' Line 132: Cleopatra was an Egyptian queen irresistible to men.'
' Line 133: Atalanta was a fast runner, beaten in a race by a man who dropped golden apples to stall her as she picked them up. He thus won her as a bride. '
' Line 134: Lucretia was a chaste virgin who was raped. '
' Line 136: Command. '
' Line 141: This is a critique of the poetry. '
' Line 147: Bag and baggage represents a lot of luggage, whereas a scrip and scrippage is just a pouch and its contents. '
' Line 150: The feet are referring to the measures of the poem, or verses. Having more feet than the verses would bear means the poem did not follow the rules of poetry. That the feet were too lame to bear themselves without the verse is another critique of the poem. '
' Line 157: ?'
' Line 159: the reference to Pythagoras is an allusion to the belief in reincarnation. Irish enchanters were thought to be able to enchant rats with rhyming. '
' Line 161: Do you know. '
' Line 171: Urgent pleading. '
' Line 177: That little amount of time will seem as long as it would take to explore the South Seas. '
' Line 192: Honestly and seriously. '
' Line 201: Gargantua was a giant. '
' Line 203: An intense interrogation. '
' Line 206: Small atoms. '
' Line 214: Frolics '
' Line 239: i.e., have you memorized the petty quotes engraved in gold rings. '
' Line 241: A cheap wall-hanging, and source of more petty clichés. '
' Line 254: A non-being, zero. '
' Line 268: different. '
' Line 278: Gout was seen as a disease of the rich.'
' Line 280: The tiring burden of studying. '
' Line 287: Between sessions? '
' Line 305: ? '
' Line 308: Medicine, treatment for illness. '
' Line 312: A lover, full of fantasies. '
' Line 313: A sickness with daily aches and fever. '
' Line 320: Dark circles under the eye, due to lack of sleep and crying. '
' Line 321: Unwelcoming of conversation. '
' Line 327: Accessories. '
' Line 347: Subject to change. '
' Line 355: A cave. '
' Line 357: ? '
' Line 361: Cottage. '
' Line 1: Goats?'
' Line 7: Jupiter, disguised as a lowly human, once stayed in as a guest in a cottage.'
' Line 10: precocious, bright'
' Line 11: a very expensive bill, in a lowly tavern.'
' Line 20: Touchstone wishes Audrey was lying when she says she is honest.'
' Line 23: ugly.'
' Line 24: Honesty with beauty is too much of a good thing.'
' Line 29: Obvious sexual punning on venereal disease.'
' Line 30: Audrey is ignorant, and does not know what foul means.'
' Line 33: vicar?'
' Line 39: Horn-beasts such as deer, with an additional allusion to the horns of cuckolding.'
' Line 41: Again, horns as a metaphor for being cuckolded.'
' Line 43: Are only poor men cuckolded? No.'
' Line 58: A small matter that needs to be taken care of.'
' Line 61: A bow is a yoke, a curb is a ?, and bells are used to track a flying falcon in falconry.'
' Line 63: bill?'
' Line 67: wainscot?'
' Line 77: This is based on an old song, and was probably changed to suit Touchstone. '
' Line 13: The virgin goddess of the moon.'
' Line 20: Hollow as a goblet, which were only covered when not used, or a nut that has been rotted out from the inside.'
' Line 26: tapster?'
' Line 35: traverse means askew or out of kilter. A puny tilter is a small or young jouster.'
' Line 36: lance.'
' Line 11: clever, regarding what Silvius is saying.'
' Line 13: the smallest things.'
' Line 23: mark due to pressing into the skin.'
' Line 37: a remark on Phebes poor upbringing, since she treats Silvius so rudely. '
' Line 45: ordinary market wares.'
' Line 58: clothes, features?'
' Line 70: as in saucy, or mouthy, or insulting.'
' Line 76: olives apparently grow in turfts.'
' Line 98: annoying.'
' Line 111: carlot?'
' Line 126: damask?'
' Line 136: A legal term, meaning that not to assert something is not equivalent to refuting. '
' Line 5: Common sense or judgment..'
' Line 8: Sad could mean heavy as well as serious. Jaques means it one way, and Rosalind plays with it in another.'
' Line 10: Emulation = envious. Fantastical = imaginative. Politic = cunning. Nice = delicate. '
' Line 14: ingredients.'
' Line 15: ?'
' Line 28: speak with a fake accent, to appear sophisticated.'
' Line 32: Been in one of the boats of Venice.'
' Line 40: i.e. Cupid hit his shoulder, but not his heart.'
' Line 44: desirous.'
' Line 47: Marriage arrangement.'
' Line 50: obligated.'
' Line 57: good humor.'
' Line 62: stranded, stuck, at a loss for words.'
' Line 63: this seems an odd custom?'
' Line 64: God protect us. Matter = substance, either as subject of discussion or truth behind their words. Shift = course of action.'
' Line 68: out of topics to discuss?'
' Line 70: ?'
' Line 72: Another pun. Shakespeare loved them. Suit can mean both a pleading for something or a suit of clothes.'
' Line 78: Die by proxy, by having someone else doing it in your place.'
' Line 80: Literally.'
' Line 81: Troilus was killed by Achilles.'
' Line 83: Leander?'
' Line 114: The authority by which Orlando will wed Rosalind, since no one is there to give her away.'
' Line 116: Women think before they act.'
' Line 125: A pigeon known for aggressively defending his mates from competitors?'
' Line 126: Parrots talk to rain? New-fangled = fascinated by new things.'
' Line 128: Like a statue in a water fountain. '
' Line 136: ?'
' Line 138: ?'
' Line 145: make her fault seem like it belongs to her husband.'
' Line 158: inoffensive. Dangerous because to swear by God might be to use his name in vain?'
' Line 170: Show how you scorned your own sex.'
' Line 173: Portugal?'
' Line 176: Cupid. '
' Line 3: The rulers of lands conquered by the Romans were paraded before Caesar.'
' Line 14: Play the swaggerer? Bear this, bear all?'
' Line 25: Leather.'
' Line 26: A brownish yellow.'
' Line 28: The hands of a housewife were coarsened with work.'
' Line 35: giant rude?'
' Line 36: Means black. This is not the most PC phrase of the bard. '
' Line 40: She makes me out to be as cruel as herself.'
' Line 76: The clearings on the boarders of a forest.'
' Line 77: Cottage of a shepherd.'
' Line 79: Willow trees.'
' Line 86: Acts like an older sister.'
' Line 103: Thinking about stuff.'
' Line 111: Describing the quick darting movements the head of a snake.'
' Line 124: Wicked, corrupt.'
' Line 145: Stories.'
' Line 156: Little time.'
' Line 171: Anyone would think I counterfeited well. '
' Line 11: Teasing, playing.'
' Line 29: Heathen philosopher? '
' Line 39: ipse means he.'
' Line 48: To hit someone with a stick. '
' Line 26: two rams?'
' Line 27: thrasonical = bragging.'
' Line 33: incontinent= immediate or unchaste'
' Line 45: intelligence.'
' Line 51: Some magicians supposedly practiced black magic by dealing with demons. '
' Line 54: straights of fortune?'
' Line 59: Which I value. '
' Line 4: A married woman.'
' Line 9: Go straight into the music, without clearing the throat, or other means of delay. '
' Line 4: As those who fear they hope without ever getting what they hope for. '
' Line 25: To resolve all your questions.'
' Line 42: i.e., put me to death, where I will go to purgatory. Possibly, let me clear myself of the charge of lying? '
' Line 48: A term of court, from highly convoluted books of etiquette. '
' Line 52: An engaged couple.'
' Line 53: To promise not to do something, in the case of marriage not to be romantically involved with others.'
' Line 58: wise, discerning.'
' Line 59: The jibes of a fool may entertain, but be a little too accurate for comfort. '
' Line 66: The first response to an insult is a polite reply.'
' Line 68: The second response to the insult is a slightly edgy response.'
' Line 69: The next step is a slightly angry response to the insult.'
' Line 71: The next step is say that what the person is saying is not true. This is just short of saying they are lying, since it could just mean they are mistaken.'
' Line 72: The next step is to actually say the person is lying.'
' Line 73: The last two steps are not so clearly explained. It may be possible that the Lie Circumstantial would be that the person is only lying due to the circumstances, whereas the Lie direct is just to call the other person a liar. '
' Line 76: Prepared to duel, then left.'
' Line 86: Resolve.'
' Line 93: A cover used by hunters to deceive the game they hunt.'
' Line 95: Hymen is the god of marriage. In this production we made her a goddess.'
' Line 118: Argument.'
' Line 139: She is saying that she accepts his faithful love.'
' Line 145: Put together a powerful military force.'
' Line 161: Things that were well planned and begun, e.g. marriage.'
' Line 163: Challenging times.'
' Line 169 Measures both of wealth and music.'
' Line 182: Victualled? '
' Line 3: No bush?'
' Line 14: Originally, Rosalind would have been played by a man. So you would have a man playing a woman pretending to be a man.'